Running’s Coming Home!

Has anyone found this third lockdown a bit tougher than the previous ones? Maybe it’s been the sheer Groundhog Day monotony of it all, the bad weather, the dark evenings… as someone who works in public health I know it’s been necessary, but I think we’ve all just had enough now. I’ve never lacked motivation to train during lockdown – maybe because there’s always been an event on the horizon and I’m a hopeless optimist – but mostly because running with some structure has been my main means of staying sane. I was disappointed when the Hardmoors 55 had to be postponed (understandably) when it was due to take place on 27th March, just two days before it probably could have happened, but there we are. Hopefully these blocks of training will pay off in the long run!

Now we have a roadmap, spring is in the air and (all being well) real races are going to happen in a few weeks’ time! The first one on my calendar is the Vale of York 10 on 18th April. This was cancelled last year, and it’s still not certain at this point whether it will go ahead, but hopefully we’ll know soon. To be honest I’m doing it because it starts and finishes in our village! Even if it goes ahead I’ll just be trotting round, because I’ll be tpaering for the following weekend when it’s the Hardmoors 30 at Whitby, which should have been on New Year’s Day. We’ll probably have staggered starts, but it will be great just to be up on the Cleveland Way by the sea with the Hardmoors family. I’ve missed that so much. Another event on the spring schedule is the fabulous Endurancelife Northumberland in May, which had to be postponed from February – so should hopefully be a bit warmer than last year!

Endurancelife!

As the year progresses, the schedule starts to get a bit crowded with events that have been postponed or rearranged following the pandemic, such as Endure 24 in July, which I was planning to run solo. My main concern at the moment is that the Hardmoors 55 has been provisionally rearranged for 21st August, which is the same week as the UTMB OCC – which it took me three attempts to get into, but I finally did! Obviously I can’t do them both within a few days; but will the OCC happen? Will travel to and from France even be possible? The French are well behind us with their vaccination programme, so it’s hard to say at this point. I guess the picture will be a bit clearer in a couple of months. The idea of running the Hardmoors 55 in summer weather is very tempting, but I may never get into the OCC again. First world problems, hey? I know I’m very lucky really, and do appreciate that.

I’ve really been missing big hills during lockdown. During this time I’ve personally felt it’s not right to travel to go for a run, but it’s given me an opportunity to really get to know the trails in my local area, and I’ve worked out routes of varying distances that I regularly run.

Luckily there are a few undulating bits! My training plan for the 55 from coach Kim Cavill featured some regular tempo hills sessions, which are basically longish hilly interval reps. They’re hard work, but hopefully helping my legs to build some stamina. I also think the strength sessions Kim has given me to do have helped me to run better and feel stronger. I’ll certainly always include this sort of work in my training from now on. I can’t wait until 29th March, when we’ll be allowed to travel out of our local areas. I’ve booked the week after Easter off work and will definitely be heading for the North York Moors and the Wolds for some ‘fun’ runs!

How’s your 2021 schedule looking?

Stay safe and keep running folks, the end is in sight  🙂

Working With a Running Coach

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to work with a running coach? I certainly have from time to time. I’ve thought it might be good for me to get a training plan tailored to my own requirements – especially as I’ve got older, as most plans don’t take account of age – but then I realised I’d actually have to be accountable to someone who might judge my cake and alcohol intake, so I didn’t take things any further. When I used to train for road marathons I’d follow my trusty Asics Sub 4 plan. Now that I’ve moved on to longer, off-road events I generally use the plan I took from the Race to the Stones website when I ran that in 2017. Both seem to work pretty well. But lately, at times such as when I’ve started to fade towards the end of an ultra, I’ve wondered “Is there a way I could do this better and finish stronger? And if so, what would I need to do?”.

Continue reading “Working With a Running Coach”

Win a Copy of the Cook Book In Their Footsteps

If there’s one thing I love as much as running it’s cake. Some would say I only run to remain cake neutral! So I love the look of In Their Footsteps, a new cook book produced by the owners of a local tea room near Ripon. It’s in one of my favourite parts of the world, and I ran the Burn Valley Half not far from there in the summer. So I’m delighted to have a copy of the book to give away to one of you lovely people!

Continue reading “Win a Copy of the Cook Book In Their Footsteps”

Race Review – Burn Valley Half Marathon

When I entered the Burn Valley Half a few weeks ago it seemed like a good idea at the time. I thought a hilly half marathon would be great training for the Hardmoors Rosedale Marathon in August and, ultimately, the Snowdonia Marathon in October. Also, the race starts and finishes in the Yorkshire Dales market town of Masham, famed for its breweries, and we’d been promised beer at the finish. But that was before the heatwave! And then the woman who runs the nearby campsite where we stayed the night before cheerfully told us she believed Burn Valley to be the hardest road half marathon in the UK. So when the day came I was kind of dreading running up and down hills under a scorching sun on baking Tarmac. Oh well, what doesn’t kill you etc…

 

I travelled to the start with my friend Colin, an age group duathlete who didn’t seem unduly bothered at the prospect of the hills or the heat; but then he is currently training for Rat Race’s City to Summit and knocking out brick sessions all the time. Obviously in a different league to yours truly! I’d heard a few days previously that over 300 people had entered, but there were only 227 finishers on the day, so clearly some people had been put off by the weather forecast. I approached it as a training exercise and decided I’d be happy to plod as slowly as necessary to avoid keeling over with heatstroke. Signing on at Masham Town Hall was quick and efficient, with minimal toilet queues.

After a race briefing including the news that an extra water point had been put on (thank God) we set off bang on time. After a circuit of the market place we ran out of town and started climbing up to Swinton Castle. That one wasn’t too bad on fresh legs. After dropping down from the castle the route winds through the Burn Valley, taking in several decent climbs along the way. The biggest of these comes at about halfway, with a gradual climb of about a mile up to a war memorial to the Leeds Pals. I must admit I wasn’t feeling too good at this point. Apart from being hellishly hot and sweaty, my belly felt a bit weird. But fortunately we then turned left and began a gentle descent down Colsterdale with beautiful views.

I’m not sure whether the second half was easier than the first or whether I just felt a bit better! We climbed up and down through the villages of Healey and Fearby. I’m sure all the runners were really glad of the numerous water points laid on by the lovely marshals. I drank a bit and poured some water over my head at pretty much each point. Locals also turned out to support, some of them spraying hoses across the road. It was then back up to Swinton Castle again, where I inflicted a rather sweaty hug on my friend Phil, who was marshalling there. From the castle it was downhill for about the last mile and a half back to Masham. I was pretty glad to see the 13 mile marker, and a shout of “Come on Knavesmire” powered me round the square to the finish, where my husband had cycled out to meet me. At the end we received a banana, some Yorkshire tea, a can of beer and a t-shirt.

My finish time was 2:16:44, reflecting the tough route and the heat. I was 169th out of 227 overall, 53rd out of 92 women and 13th out of 24 in the W50 category. I was a bit narked that there were only large t-shirts left when I finished. I wasn’t fast, but I was a long way from last. It’s not much use for me to wear, but at least it has the course profile handily printed on the back for future reference!

 

Overall I’d really recommend this event. It’s really well organised with a fun, challenging and very scenic course. I’m really surprised more people didn’t sign up for it. Masham also has some great pubs and cafés for cooling post-race beer and/or ice cream. I’d love to do it again next year. Hopefully it will be a bit less hot!

Race Review – Top of the Wolds 10K Challenge 2018

I recently decided that I have two goals for the autumn; to have a last attempt at a sub 50 10K, and the Snowdonia Marathon. The first is because I figure if I don’t have a proper crack at sub 50 now it will be too late because I’ll be too old. The second is because I’ve heard such good things about Snowdonia that I decided to do that instead of an autumn road marathon. Besides, I’ve started to find road marathons a bit boring and have also realised that many hours of pounding on Tarmac doesn’t do my dodgy hamstring tendon any good. So I’ve decided that to prepare for these two goals I need to run more 10Ks and lots of hills; the Top of the Wolds Challenge seemed a good way to do both at the same time! I love the Yorkshire Wolds Way, and did quite a bit of my Race to the Stones training there last year.

Organised by the Yorkshire Wolds Runners, this race starts and finishes at a village called Warter and is basically a tour of Nunburnholme Wold. It’s a fairly bijou affair and has only about 300 places available. With a very civilised starting time of 10 am, I left home in York at 8.30 and got there with plenty of time to spare. Number pick-up was on the day, and signing on at race HQ, Warter Community Centre, was very efficient. There was ample parking on the field next door, and plenty of toilets, some in the hall and some temporary ones outside. I paid a visit, warmed up, then went to the loo again just because I could. I must admit when I entered I didn’t realise how seriously people take this race and, looking round, realised I should probably have worn my club vest. We were started by the town crier of Pocklington, which was a novel touch!

The route is a mixture of road and trail. I’d plumped for road shoes, as there didn’t seem to be any technical terrain on the route map, and that worked out fine. The first couple of miles were on undulating Tarmac – a couple of inclines, but nothing too testing. Then we got to The Hill. Nunburnholme Hill is what this race is all about really – I think that’s why it’s called a Challenge rather than just a 10K! It goes on for about a mile (although it feels more like about three when you’re going up it) and is quite steep in places. After a while everyone runs out of steam and adopts a walk/jog approach for the rest of the climb. I say everyone – I’m sure there were some super fit types at the head of the field who ran all the way up, but nobody in the middle of the pack with me! Luckily there were some motivational signs like this to help us along.

The weather certainly wasn’t helping us – so warm and humid, I was actually wishing for a bit of rain before I got to the top. In typically cruel fashion, the race photographer, Tom Flynn, was lying in wait at the top of the hill and captured my best tomato face! The view was spectacular though.

Fortunately what goes up must come down, and the overall trajectory for the second half of the race was downhill. It also involved a lovely bit of trail, through some woods and across some fields, with two water points en route.

There was a final vicious little uphill as we came back into the village, then ran round a field to the finish, by which time I was a proper sweaty mess. I really had no idea how long this race would take me, but was very happy to squeak in just under the hour at 59:06; 151st overall and 16th out of 48 in the F45 category – another event where there is a V50 category for men but not for women. Why?!

After crossing the line we were given a fab medal and a ticket for some tea and cake in the community centre. I think the cake was provided by a local deli, and it was fantastic!

Overall this event was brilliant – excellent value, well organised and marshalled by lots of lovely, friendly people. I’d definitely do it again. Also great training for my next event this weekend – my first Hardmoors marathon, the White Horse. Eek!

 

Top Tips for Marathon Monster Month

If you (like me) are following a standard kind of 16-week raining plan for the London Marathon (or indeed any other marathon at around the same time) you’re probably now just into what’s known in running circles as ‘Monster Month’ – the four week period where you do your hardest block of work, before you start to taper. It’s a time when you can build on the previous nine weeks of training to give yourself a bit of a beasting before you start to back off a bit in the three week run-up to the big day.

It’s also a time when you might think either a) “I’m starting to feel really good now” or b) “Why in the wide world of sport did I ever sign up for this?” I’ve done quite a few cycles of marathon training now, and I’ve felt both ways at various points! But I haven’t run a road marathon since London last year, so feeling I’m slightly nervous about this year. I’m not a running  expert by any means, but I have learnt that Monster Month is a time when you have to look after yourself if you want to make it to race day feeling on top form. So here are my top tips for surviving it!

Listen to your body and don’t be a complete slave to your training plan. If you pick up a niggle or feel ill, don’t try to push on through just because the plan says you have to run today. Better to take a couple of days off than have to give up completely because you aggravated something by ignoring it. Nobody gets through a whole plan without missing a few sessions – that’s just life.

If you do have a niggle that doesn’t go away after a couple of days, or gets worse when you run, see a physio. They’ll probably be able to help you find a way to manage it if it’s not serious. The longer you leave it and the worse it gets, the harder it will be to deal with.

Look after your immune system. Hard training puts a huge strain on it, and will make you more susceptible to any bugs floating around. I sometimes take an Omega 3 supplement after a long Sunday run for its anti-inflammatory properties. If I feel like I might be coming down with something I take some immune-boosting echinacea. Pay attention to hand hygiene too, which is how most bugs get passed on.

Get plenty of sleep. Sleepy time is when your body can rest and recover from all the stress you’ve put on it in training.

Look after your feet – they deserve a bit of pampering. I absolutely love the Body Shop’s Peppermint Intensive Foot Rescue Cream. And if you have any issues with your shoes, sort them out now – don’t wait til two weeks before the event to get new ones!

Eat well – plenty of protein, good carbs and lots of fruit and veggies. This really will help to fuel your training and recovery. Monster Month isn’t a time to diet, but neither is it an excuse to eat lots of junk, especially if you’re looking to lose a few pounds. Although I do like a bit of cake after my long Sunday run!

Keep booze to a minimum; it makes more difference than you might think, even if you don’t feel hung over. I know from personal experience this can be hard if you have the sort of friends who think it’s weird not to drink alcohol when you go out, but it really is worth it. I find if I drink on Friday and/or Saturday I don’t run as well on Sunday. Although I do like a glass of red with my post-run Sunday dinner. Well it’s got antioxidants, hasn’t it?!

Get a sports massage halfway through the month if you can. Your legs will deserve and appreciate it! And make sure you do plenty of stretching and foam rolling – but not too hard with the roller.

Most of all, enjoy it! I always think an event is as much about the training as the big day itself. Embrace the challenge and be proud of what you’re doing, especially if it’s your first time. Don’t look upon a long run as punishment. Get your tunes going (if you like) and settle in for the ride.

Monster Month is also a great time to experiment with different running fuels. The more I run long distances, the more convinced I am that keeping well fuelled is as important as training to success. Obviously different things work well for different people. Personally I’m happy to eat ‘real’ food in an ultra, when I’m running slowly, but I can’t do that in a faster road marathon. I used to always take Clif Shot Bloks in marathons, but struggled to eat them at London last year, and I think that’s why I slowed down near the end and didn’t quite hit my four hour target. This year I’m planning to take gels, although I’m not sure which ones yet. I like SiS isotonic gels, but find them really difficult to open on the run. Last weekend I tried an OTE gel, which was much easier to open and  tasted good, so I might take those – but I’ll try some others in training first. One thing’s for sure, nailing your nutrition will definitely help you to avoid the dreaded Wall!

Do you have any top tips for Monster Month? I’d love to hear them. Good luck with it anyway!

 

 

 

Race Review – Dixons Carphone Race to the Stones 2017

Wow. Race to the Stones. I’d been looking forward to this one for so long and it didn’t disappoint! This is quite a long post, but lots of people have asked me questions about RTTS because they’re thinking of entering, so I don’t want to leave anything out. I’ve been interested in RTTS ever since I became aware of it two years ago. It’s a 100K ultra that starts in Lewknor in Berkshire and follows the Ridgeway path, finishing at the ancient stone circle at Avebury in Wiltshire. Some people do it in one day and some do it over two days, camping at the halfway point. Some run and some walk. I had no idea whether I could run 100K – if I could keep going for the amount of time that would take –  but I became a bit obssessed with it; the rolling hills, the Field of Dreams… it looked amazing! I took a charity place with Cancer Research UK, partly because it’s a great cause, but also because I thought I’d be more likely to keep going if people had sponsored me to do it. You can read about my training in previous posts. After all the months since I’d entered last December it was hard to believe the big day was finally happening!

Steve and I travelled down from Yorkshire the day before the event and stayed nearby at Stokenchurch, about five minutes’ drive from the start at Field Farm in Lewknor. There was a great chippy nearby, perfect for carb loading! I was too nervous/excited to sleep well and woke up at about 4am. I had a tin of rice pudding for breakfast and we headed to Lewknor at about 6.45. Participants were started in waves to ease congestion, and I was in the second one at 7.45. There were no queues at registration and hardly any at the portaloos. Unlike most ultras RTTS doesn’t have a mandatory kit list, so it’s up to you what you carry. The weather forecast was dry, but ominous grey clouds were looming, so I did take my rain jacket and hat. There was a great atmosphere at the start. I couldn’t quite believe I was actually about to attempt to run 62 miles, twice as far as I’d ever run before. I decided just to approach it as a big day out and take it one mile at a time. We set off on time in a blaze of coloured smoke!

The first couple of miles were pretty flat, which was a good warm up. But there are lots of hills! There were pit stops approximately every 10K on the course, and all were really well stocked with a wide variety of snacks and drinks. I’d only brought one emergency Clif Shotblok in my backpack and I didn’t even need that. There were High 5 gels and electrolyte or energy drinks at each stop too. When I arrived at each pit stop I had a cup of Coke and made a High 5 Zero drink to take with me, because it was a warm day and I wanted to minimise the chance of getting cramp. I had in mind Nicky Spinks‘ advice on ultra eating, which is to eat lots and start early, so at Pit Stop 1 I had half a banana and took a Perkier quinoa bar to eat on the move. I’d heard many tales of how it gets harder to eat as time goes on, so I made an effort. I had various snacks along the way, including Mini Cheddars and chocolate, but I found that crisps, Perkier bars and Jelly Babies worked best for me. My strategy was to eat something whenever I was walking uphill.

The weather forecast turned out to be wrong and it actually rained quite a bit in the first half. I put my hat on but not my jacket, as it was really warm. The route flattened out a bit as we ran alongside the Thames for a while and also went through a couple of villages. People say that in ultras you go through good phases and bad ones, and that both pass. I felt great in the first quarter of RTTS, but towards the end of the first half I started to feel a bit nauseous. I think it was because I’d taken a couple of High 5 gels and they didn’t agree with me. But I focussed on the beautiful scenery and was grateful that my legs and feet felt fine; and I knew that Steve was waiting for me at the halfway point and that give me a boost. Just before halfway I also saw Shona from Run Mummy Run, who was out supporting, and she gave me hug even though I must have been very smelly, which was lovely!

I arrived at halfway after six and a half hours and couldn’t imagine how I was going to cover that distance again, almost certainly taking even longer. I saw a huge inflatable gantry with Finish on it, thought “But I’m not finishing yet” and ran around it, then had to be directed back through it to cross the halfway timing mat! I took a break here of around ten minutes. You can actually have a proper hot meal at halfway, but I couldn’t face that and certainly didn’t want it jiggling around in my belly throughout the second half. To be honest I didn’t really want to eat anything. There was a huge table of cakes (one of the event sponsors is Ministry of Cake), which I would normally have been all over, but I just didn’t fancy any of them, even though there was carrot cake, my favourite! But Steve told me (quite rightly) that if I didn’t eat something I’d bonk and practically forced me to eat a slice of Victoria sponge, which I actually think did me a lot of good. I also changed my top and socks, which had become a bit damp with the rain. I set off feeling refreshed, more optimistic and no longer nauseous.

After the halfway stop I felt good for quite a long time. I’m not saying it was easy by any means, but it was less hard than I’d imagined for about 20 miles. At mile 36 my Garmin bleeped and I thought “Only a marathon to go now” and then laughed because that seemed so ridiculous! I mentioned it to another runner and we both wondered how, over the course of a few years, we’d both gone from doing a bit of jogging for weight loss to running 100K for ‘fun’. It is bizarre really. Anyway, it seemed to me that there were more short, steep hills in the first half and more gradual inclines and tough terrain in the second half. A lot of the Ridgeway consists of hard, stony path that’s very harsh on the feet and more likely to cause underfoot problems than softer trail. Gentler inclines may seem easier on the face of it, but whereas you’d walk a steep climb you’re more likely to run a gentle one, which becomes quite energy-sapping after a long time.

At around 52 miles I was finding it hard to eat again. I took a mouthful of a peanut butter sandwich at a pit stop, just to have a change from crisps, but found it so hard to chew and swallow I had to bin the rest. And I love peanut butter! The going seemed to get a lot tougher after this point. I kept telling myself “It’s only ten miles now, only nine miles now, single figures now!”, but it became more and more a case of run/walk. At times, even though I wasn’t going uphill, I just had to take little walk breaks. A friend of mine who’s an Ironman had advised me to try and enjoy the whole thing, even the tough bits, and I did my best. When I got to the final pit stop I looked at the food and felt that all I could manage was a biscuit. I sighed and set off to cover the last eight miles. I rang Steve to let him know I was on the last leg, as we’d arranged. He was having his dinner in a pub and I so wished I was with him! It was 8pm by now. I knew this was the time I had to dig really deep. I reached into my Camelbak and got out my CRUK wristband. I put it on to remind myself of why I was really doing this and thought about all the lovely family and friends who’d generously donated to my fund or had been affected by cancer. The last few miles were definitely for them. The hills continued mercilessly for about the next five miles. On the plus side, the scenery was quite spectacular at this point. At around 95K my Garmin died so I had no further idea of time or pace. I was in the Twilight Zone. And then I binned it! I’m not sure how, but I managed to trip on one of the stones poking up through the path. In a split second I thought to myself “If I go down on this rocky bit now, this could be it. It could all be over so close to the end. I’m not having that”! I’ve no idea how, but I managed to launch myself onto the grassy verge at the side of the path for a soft landing. My left calf cramped up as I did so, but at least I wasn’t injured. A couple of other lovely runners stopped to see if I was OK and luckily I was. A bit of a stretch and I was off again.

Those last three miles were so hard. At that point I really wanted it to be over. It’s actually mostly downhill near the end, but the irony is that the path is like a really rutted cart track so you can hardly find a good line to run down. At least it was still light at this point – I can imagine it would be even harder in the dark. I told myself “It’s only a Parkrun now” but when you’ve been on the go for over 12 hours it’s a big ask. I felt like I might be getting a blister but couldn’t be bothered to do anything about it as the end was so close. Then you take a right turn and see the lights of the finishing area in the distance – yay! But, as a final cruel twist, when you run into Avebury village and through the stones, you haven’t actually finished – you have to run about another mile back the way you’ve just come, across a field and down another road to the end! I’d really had enough at that point. “Christ” said a man I was running near, “Nobody said it was Race to the Stones and back again”! I had to laugh, despite everything. I walked part of the field, but just managed to summon up my last bit of energy to trot down the road to the finish. It was a great welcome though; lots of people cheering, pumping music, and I could see Steve waiting as I approached. And suddenly it was all over! Someone hung a medal round my neck, someone else took a photo and the job was done. I was so happy just to stop moving forward.

 

The finish area was great. There was plenty of hot food and a place to sit. I still couldn’t really eat though. I took a sausage in a bun, but could only manage the sausage. I can’t believe I couldn’t even eat a doughnut! I went to get a printout of my results and my chip time was 13:36:21. I’d come 275th out of 961 overall, 48th woman and third in the V50 age category. That surprised me, as I’d felt pretty slow most of the time! I felt a bit dazed to be honest. It was dark by the time we left and we could see a procession of head torches up on the hill. It was only as I lay in the bath a bit later that it began to sink in that I’d covered 62 miles on my own two feet. It hurt (and it would hurt even more the next day!), but it was worth it – and, even better, donations were still coming in. I was a very tired but happy bunny.

So, would I do it again? Probably not, but only because it’s so far from Yorkshire. However, I would definitely recommend RTTS, especially as a first 100K, because it’s so well supported. Organisation and logistics are great. There are shuttles between the start and finish, and the halfway camp looked like a lovely spot to chill for the evening. Also, everyone is really friendly and helpful. At the last pit stop somebody even took my water bottle and filled it for me. I got the impression the people there were having a good look at everyone to make sure they were OK. I was asked at several pit stops how I felt. Everyone was fantastic. Although I did think playing Jump Around by House of Pain at one pit stop was taking the Mickey a bit! The countryside is fantastic, with amazing views throughout and the free photos that upload automatically to Facebook are a real bonus. If you’re wondering whether or not to do it, I’d say go for it. It’s amazing what you can pull out of the bag when you have to! Below is a geeky bit about kit etc for anyone who’s interested. If you have any questions about RTTS please feel free to give me a shout.

If anyone would like to donate to my CRUK Just Giving page it’s still here. Every little helps! 🙂

 

The Kit Bit

Shoes:  Inov8 Trail Talons. Cannot praise these highly enough. They are specially designed for hard trails and performed really well. They were recommended for me by Stuart at Accelerate in Sheffield, to whom I am very grateful. I did have one small blister on my right big toe, but that’s all. Toenails all present and correct as I type!

Socks:  Inov8 All Terrain. It was well worth changing them at half time.

Shorts:  Ronhill Aspiration Twin Shorts. So comfy! No chafing at all despite much sweating!

Tops:  Ronhill and Saucony sleeveless tops. I’ve had them so long I can’t remember what they’re called!

Bra:  Moving Comfort. I put a bit of K tape under my front strap as a precaution.

Backpack:  Camelbak Marathoner. I took out the bladder and put stuff in the space. It’s amazing how much you can get in there if you pack it carefully, and not a hint of chafing over the whole day. For drink I used my Camelbak soft bottle in my front pocket.

Waterproof:  Inov8 Race Ultra Shell. This is the most expensive but least used item of clothing I own apart from my wedding dress!

Head torch:  Petzl. Steve had bought this for me and was a bit disappointed that I hadn’t used it!

Watch:  Garmin Forerunner 35. I replaced my ancient 210 with this just a couple of weeks ago and it has a much longer life – it died at about 12:30.

Hat:  a Brooks sun hat I bought in a sale ages ago, but it did pretty well in the rain.

I also carried (but didn’t use) Saucony arm warmers, Compeed, a couple of strips of K tape, a tenner (just in case!), spare socks, spare top, ibuprofen and a spare hair elastic.

THE END!

 

Race to the Stones Ready?

As I post this, the Race to the Stones 100K is now only a couple of days away. I’ve had this event on my mind since I first became aware of it two years ago and thought it looked amazing. When entry opened late last year I decided to take the plunge and give it a go. It’s more than twice as far as I’ve ever run before and I’ve spent the last six months running as many trails and climbing as many hills as possible to prepare – most recently the Hardmoors Wainstones Half. I actually can’t quite believe Race to the Stones is nearly here!

The Wainstones Half

 

Our recent holiday in the Pyrenees, when the OH did the Ariégeoise cyclosportive, was a great opportunity to do some hill training, and I got out there as often as I could. It was hot, hard work, but I hope the effort will stand me in good stead for Saturday! Running in the mountains was fantastic, something I’d love to do more of. I met a lovely woman there who runs a trail running B&B with her husband and thought what a fabulous lifestyle that must be. Enough fantasising already!

 

My fundraising for Cancer Reasearch UK has gone pretty well – I’m now well over the £500 mark and think there’s still a bit more to come in. Thinking of all the lovely family and friends who have supported me will be a great motivator when things get tough on Saturday – which I’m sure they will. I’ve been holding a competition in the office for people to guess my finishing time, and these have varied from 10 hours (in my dreams!) to 19 hours. Hopefully I’ll be somewhere in between!

To be honest I’ve found it pretty hard to think about anything else this week, despite being at work. I’ve made lists of things to pack and carry with me and bought a special squashy drinking bottle with a tube for my Camelbak. I’ve been obsessively checking the weather forecast (obviously) and it looks pretty good at the moment – cloudy but no rain. My legs feel OK at the moment; my dodgy hamstring is behaving, although it could easily kick off on the day. I’m trying not to stress, but just look upon the event as a good day out and not worry too much about finishing time. I guess my main aim is just to finish with a smile on my face! I feel a bit nervous, but not in a bad way. I just want to get on with it!

You can read about my personal reasons for running Race to the Stones for CRUK here and if you’d like to donate the link to my Just Giving page is here.

Good luck to anyone else taking part – come and say hi if you see me there!